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CT Interiors La Fontaine's Fables Print

Print of Antique Textile 18th Century French Cartoon Tapestry Wall Art Décor
  • From £39.00
  • (Delivery from £10.00)
Item in Stock | Usually dispatched within 24 hours
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The original trio of 18th century tapestries were woven in France in a wool and silk weave to depict three of the Fables of La Fontaine, each encircled by a colourful floral arrangement on burgundy. Each of the three stories written by La Fontaine were adapted from the classical fabulists Aesop and outlined below.

  • Premium-quality fine art, giclée paper (200gsm)
  • Frame and matting isn't included. Print ONLY
  • Shipped in a damage-proof artwork tube

The pieces of artwork are high-quality art prints of original antique textiles. Produced by scanning unique textiles from a range of periods and origins at an ultra-high resolution in order to capture every detail of the one-of-a-kind pieces. 

You'll receive your print/s on either fine art paper or cotton canvas. Both of which work perfectly to capture the fine details and subtle colours of large, full-colour images. Resulting in stunning works of art that truly encapsulate the charm of the original pieces.

 

The Wolf and the Lamb

A wolf comes upon a lamb and begins to justify taking its life by accusing it of various misdemeanours, all of which the lamb proves to be impossible. Losing patience, the wolf replies that the offences must have been committed by some other member of the lamb's family and that it does not propose to delay its meal by enquiring any further. The morals drawn are that the tyrant can always find an excuse for his tyranny: “The strongest side always carries the argument.”

 

The Wolf and the Crane

A feeding wolf got a small bone stuck in his throat and begged the other animals for help by promising a reward. Only the Crane agrees to try and help by putting its long bill down the Wolf's throat to remove the trapped bone. But when the Crane asks for its reward, the Wolf replies, "You have put your head inside a wolf’s mouth and taken it out again in safety; that ought to be reward enough for you."

 

The Lion and the Mouse

A lion threatens a mouse that wakes him from sleep. The mouse begs forgiveness and makes the point that such unworthy prey would bring the lion no honour. The lion agrees and sets the mouse free. Later, the lion is netted by hunters, the mouse remembers its clemency and frees the lion by gnawing through the hunter’s ropes. The moral of the fable is that mercy brings its reward and that there is no being too small that it cannot help a greater.

 

Want a different size?

Please don’t hesitate to get in contact for any custom size requests, as well as any other queries.

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